Rittal’s Ri4Power provides the solution for Biomass generation plant room

The development of a power station plant room not only provided logistical and technical issues but also harsh environmental considerations for Nova Controls during their installation of water treatment PLC for a Yorkshire biomass site. The performance of Rittal’s Ri4power modular switch gear busbar system helped to deliver the solution that the site demands.

Location of the existing site structure meant that the panel had to be craned in position, therefore rigidity and strength of the framework was a priority. Ri4Power’s welded frame and tested lifting procedures assisted with the installation of the panel within the new power station plant room.

Safety was a key concern to the end customer therefore Rittal’s internal RiLine60 busbar system was shielded and the panel designed in line with IEC61641 Internal Arc Protection. Form 4 type 6 compartments segregated the control devices, busbar and outgoing terminals, which assisted the cabling on site and offered a higher level of safety.

The panel was located in a plant room where there is a possibility of high levels of moisture and the potential for an acidic atmosphere. To reduce any corrosion or damage to the panel a tropicalized paint finish was used.

Being of a modular design Rittal’s Ri4Power allowed Nova Controls to make last minute changes to the design layout.

In addition to Ri4Power system, Nova also utilised Rittal’s RPE Engineering software to generate design verification documentation that included heat calculations in line with the latest IEC61439 switchgear and Controlgear standards.

Peter Hubbert from Nova Controls commented “Working with Rittal Ri4Power gave us a proven high quality engineered product, incorporating all the solutions required to meet the demanding Form 4 specifications of our client and  the power generation market. This highly flexible product allowed us to design and configure individual compartments with a range of versatile multifunction components, affording us a speedy assembly and a vital cost effective solution in this competitive arena.”

Rittal Nova Cont IMG_1095v2

Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, 19″ Racks, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Efficient cooling from Rittal

Germany manufacturer SHW Werkzeugmaschinen GmbH, from the Swabian, manufacture moving column machine tools. Machinery from the company includes a 200-ton moving column milling machine, the PowerForce 8, which is used to mill wind turbine stators with an internal diameter of 6.5 m. At the heart of the mill is a new, variable, universal milling head of orthogonal design with a drive power of 90 kW and a torque of up to 1,725 Nm.

SHW relies on the new “Blue e” generation of cooling devices from Rittal to exploit every possible efficiency potential in enclosure climate control. Consuming 45 per cent less energy than the previous generation, the four wall-mounted devices installed on the machine provide cooling of the input and feedback modules for the axle drive, mains filters, chokes, disconnectors, contactors, relays and have a cooling output amounting to 16 kW. The refrigeration factor of 2.47 (the COP, coefficient of performance) results from the ideal interaction of all the components responsible for the cooling output, as well as from the design of the condensers, evaporators, cooling fins, pipe bends and all the other refrigeration components. Using Rittal cooling technology, SHW have been able to connect the devices via a master-slave arrangement.

Another key factor in the increased efficiency is the ideally designed control electronics, which benefit from the new Eco-Mode control system. If continuous operation of the internal fan is not required, shut down is automatic, thus cutting energy costs.

Previously SHW had problems with cooling devices from another manufacturer that malfunctioned under extreme conditions, due to the influence of carbon dust. Since changing to ex-proof cooling units from Rittal, they have been running without problems.

 

For more info and News from Rittal : http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/content/en/unternehmen/presse/pressemeldungen/pressemeldungen.jsp

Blue e Wall-Mounted Cooling Unit-s

Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s new Adaptor for RiLine60

Rittal’s RiLine60, a fully shielded flexible busbar system with a wide range of busbar adaptors, has been extended to include a new OM adaptor ideally suited for the control panel manufacturer. Combining contemporary design and outstanding safety technology, with easy design and speedy installation, RiLine60 offers a safe method of distributing power within cabinets.

A cost effective solution for power distribution, the new OM adaptor with extended connecting cables is designed for control gear components with tension spring clamp terminals. The connection leads are 165mm (previously 130mm) enabling easier connecting and work with products such as: Allen-Bradley 140M-RC2E, Eaton PKZM0, Siemens S00 and Schneider Electric GV2.

Available are four configurations; long and short support frames, adaptor ratings of 16A and 32A and an adaptor width of 45mm.

OM Adaptors-s

RIttal enclosures – The System http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal Cooling Units for Quiet Environments

Rittal’s ‘Blue e’ cooling units are usually found controlling the temperature within enclosures in workshops or on shop floors in the industrial sector where noise level is largely irrelevant as they cannot be heard above other equipment in these noisy environments.
In situations such as laboratories, offices or other more peaceful areas where cooling is required, Rittal’s TopTherm ‘Blue e’ roof-mounted cooling unit range successfully provide cooling where excessive noise would be an irritant to personnel working close to an enclosure.

With nominal outputs of 1.1 kW, Rittal roof-mounted cooling units for office applications offer viable solutions when it may have been assumed they would simply be too noisy.

Rittal’s ‘Blue e’ cooling units benefit from the intelligent and targeted use of energy, electronically commutated (EC) fan technology and are proven to achieve energy savings of up to 45%. Nano-coated condenser coils negate the need for filters and an integrated electric condensate evaporator maintains an efficient supply of cooling for longer periods of time extending maintenance intervals.

TopTherm roof mounted unit

Rittal Enclosures – The System http://www.rittal.co.uk

Demand based automatic fan speed control from Rittal

A new fan speed control sensor for Rittal’s TopTherm fan-and-filter units is now available. This handy and compact device, which is compatible with the larger models in the range of electronically commutated (EC) TopTherm fan-and-filter units, automatically adjusts the fan speed in response to changes in temperature inside the enclosure.

Providing a simple and cost effective solution to the problem of fan-and-filter units running continuously, even when not required as the panel temperature is already at an acceptable level, the sensor will help to reduce energy consumption and consequently, running costs.
With a fixed setpoint of 35 °C, the device provides continuous control with fan speeds varying linearly between 10 % at 20 °C and 100 % at 35 °C. No additional power supply is required as the sensor takes a 10 V DC feed from the fan-and-filter unit itself.

Larger TopTherm fan-and-filter units with EC motors from Rittal, accept a 0 to 10 V DC or PWM control signal and can be controlled using a programmable logic controller (PLC). A tachometer signal output to monitor fan speed and operating conditions is included, to alert users immediately should any faults or failures occur.

Rittal’s simple fan-and-filter unit is an innovative product with integrated energy efficient control, performance monitoring and sensor for speed control to achieve the best results.

Rittal Speed Control Sensor

Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

What’s on at Drives & Controls

Stands: D230, D964 & E224

Dedicate to the best in power transmission, motion control and automation, the Drives & Controls exhibition is almost here.

Rittal will be in three areas demonstrating the best in innovative enclosures for internal and external applications, climate control heating and cooling systems, power distribution switchboard and motor control products on display.

Main Stand D230 (88m²) – Hall 3
Featuring ‘The System‘ display, new support arm, TS-IT rack, Top Therm Chiller, TopConsole System |TP, Flex-Block, software demo areas and Rittal Partner enclosure

Stand D964 (59.5m²) – Hall 3
Featuring the Rittal Bus

Stand E224 (21m²)– Hall 3A (European Offshore & Energy Pavilion)
Products specific to the energy market – Wall mounted enclosures, Purge unit and TS-IT

Drives & Controls Flash - 2014

Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

How British engineers built the modern world – Interesting article from the Engineer

Interesting article from the Engineer By Stephen Harris

The stark contrast between the public estimation of architects and engineers in Britain is a reminder of the widespread lack of understanding of what engineers do.

An architect is typically seen as a highly educated and skilled professional making great contributions to civilisation through their mixture of creativity, flair for design and technical understanding. An engineer, if not thought to be boiler fixer, is relegated to the position of someone who makes other people’s great ideas happen.

But from the second half of the twentieth century, the line between the two professions was blurred somewhat by architectural movements that saw a building’s form follow its function and where design was guided and advanced by the adoption of new construction materials and techniques.

The “high-tech” or “industrial” style began as a radical and sometimes controversial way of thinking about buildings but has become one of the world’s dominant architectural approaches to creating public and commercial buildings.

Characterised by a prominent exposure of a building’s structural and functional components and the use of pre-fabricated elements such as steel frames, glass panels and supporting cables, the high-tech style can be seen in buildings from the Gherkin in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, to the Burj al-Arab in Dubai and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong.

The movement is now being reassessed by a new exhibition and TV show (the first episode of which was broadcast last night), which not only highlight the role of British architects in creating and spreading the high-tech style, but also pay some long overdue recognition to the crucial role of engineering in its formation and practice.

The architects covered by The Brits Who Built The Modern World, who include Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Nicholas Grimshaw, were both inspired by engineers and the technology they produced and often worked with them from the very beginnings of a project.1

‘None of [the key features of high-tech architecture] come about except by close collaboration between engineers and architects right from inception,’ says Tristram Carfrae, chair of Arup’s global buildings practice and a structural engineer who has worked on many high-tech buildings including the Lloyds building in London, the HSBC building in Hong Kong and the National Aquatic Centre in Beijing.

‘This is about architects and engineers sitting down and talking to each other about what are our potential ambitions working together, what are the opportunities and how can we approach this project before anyone gets a pen out and starts drawing anything. It comes from a philosophical position not an aesthetic position.’

In practice, this often means designing the shape of a building or building element to follow the limitations of a particular material or engineering principle. For example, the Schlumberger Cambridge Research building designed by Michael and Patricia Hopkins comprises a Teflon-coated glass-fibre membrane suspended from a steel superstructure – essentially a giant tent.

Read more: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/civil-and-structural/opinion/how-british-engineers-built-the-modern-world/1018030.article#ixzz2tgeARd1z

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk