Building your Data Centre on a firm foundation

An efficient IT infrastructure is now at the core of every modern business but underneath the tiers of applications and operating systems, a robust and reliable platform is essential.

Rittal’s TS IT Racks provides optimum stability and maximum space utilisation due to the welded frame construction. A depth of 1200mm allows for any additional space that may be required for the next generation of servers. Innovately designed verticals provide a static load rating of 1500kg to incorporate any increase in server weight.

Featuring Rittal’s latest door design, the new TS IT Racks has an even greater air flow with an 85% open area to provide cool air to the housed servers. An intelligent design also ensures maximum air flow with no loss of strength. Adaptable verticals allow infinite mounting positions and the tool less 19” mounts limit the time engineers are on site. Dual side panels are split making it easier to move 1200 and 1000mm deep panels. Side panels can be easily locked into place providing complete security. Security is also provided by a standard four point locking system.

Barry Maidment, Rittal IT Product Manager commented “The TS IT satisfies demands of the future, not just demands of today. Modern businesses depend on the IT infrastructure to deliver them a competitive edge, the TS IT has, for many years, been a market leader due to its’ flexibility, reliability and exceptional design. The humble rack may be the most technical item in the data centre construction but has to be the most adaptable. With a fast moving technical market the TS IT must be able to cater for multiple technologies, ie network cabling, switches, servers, power and cooling systems.“

Read more at – http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/content/en/unternehmen/presse/pressemeldungen/pressemeldung_detail_32448.jsp

 

TS IT

Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, 19″ Racks, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s RiMatrix S Data Centre roadshow

Packed into a shipping container on the back of an articulated lorry, Rittal’s RiMatrix S will again be at DatacenterDynamics Converged London 2014.
Alternatively, take the opportunity to come and see this innovation first hand at your nearest Rittal location where experts will be on hand to answer any questions.
Enfield – Unit 10, The Arena, 1004 Mollison Avenue, Enfield, Middlesex EN3 7NJ.
21 November between 0900 – 1700.

Rotherham – Braithwell Way, Hellaby Ind Est, Hellaby, Rotherham S66 8QY.
24 & 25 November between 0900 – 1700.

Aberdeen – Premier Inn, North Anderson Drive, Aberdeen, AB15 6DW.
27 November between 1000 – 1700.
28 November between 1000 – 1300.
RiMatrix S is perfectly tailored to the requirements of the small to medium sized enterprises that require short delivery times and a system that can be easily be adapted to their own infrastructure. Key to the immediate delivery is Rittal’s ability to produce mass standardised data centre modules which include fully functional network racks, climate control and power distribution as well as back up, monitoring and DCIM (Data Centre Infrastructure Management).
Rittal’s RiMatrix S opens up a new perspective for the IT World and is the revolutionary alternative to individual Data Centres. Please visit http://www.rittal.co.uk to find out more.

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Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, 19″ Racks, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s new operating housings

Rittal’s new operating housings based on AE with handle strips, unveiled at this year’s Hanover Fair, have been noted for their attractive eye-catching design, based on the support arm system system CP 60/120/180.

Supplied as standard, the new operating housings with handle strips benefit from a standardised design and operation and replace the existing range of sheet steel operating housings.

Encompassing many new and enhanced features, such as rear or front access for servicing, an aluminium front panel easily dismantled for machining, lock with integral door runners for easy locking and uniform interior installation via Rittal system accessories.

Available in 10 standard sizes, ex-stock, with protection category IP55, Rittal’s new housings are elegantly fabricated, with high functionality which will stand out thanks to the modern, attractive design, one-man assembly and support arm connection.

Read more at http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/content/en/unternehmen/presse/pressemeldungen/pressemeldung_detail_31872.jsp

Rittal New operating housings  fri131307610

 

 

Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, 19″ Racks, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Safe and simple locks

Rittal’s new TS 8 isolator door cover, when deployed in tandem with the actuation mechanisms, adjacent door locking and interconnecting rods, fulfils all requirements of the UL 508 A standard. (A requirement for the North American market.)

Featuring a raft of technical updates and design features, Rittal’s TS 8 isolator door cover range, prevents operators from opening the enclosure and touching live electrical components. The isolator door cover is mounted on the side of the enclosure to which an actuator lever or isolator switch, as the master switch, can be integrated. As a result, the door can only be opened when the isolator switch has been activated and the electricity supply to all components in the enclosure has been disconnected.

A complete row of bayed enclosures can be made safe using a single isolator door cover. The door of the neighbouring enclosure is then operated via the adjacent door latch.
Easy to assemble, the 125-mm-wide isolator door cover can be mounted on either the left or right of the enclosure by a single person. The revised locking mechanism consists of a small number of compact parts, is easy to assemble and can be deployed for all approved actuator levers. Standard side panels can be fitted on the side opening of the isolator door cover with automatic potential equalisation.

 

http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/content/en/unternehmen/presse/pressemeldungen/pressemeldung_detail_31808.jsp

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Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, 19″ Racks, Software & Service – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s new Adaptor for RiLine60

Rittal’s RiLine60, a fully shielded flexible busbar system with a wide range of busbar adaptors, has been extended to include a new OM adaptor ideally suited for the control panel manufacturer. Combining contemporary design and outstanding safety technology, with easy design and speedy installation, RiLine60 offers a safe method of distributing power within cabinets.

A cost effective solution for power distribution, the new OM adaptor with extended connecting cables is designed for control gear components with tension spring clamp terminals. The connection leads are 165mm (previously 130mm) enabling easier connecting and work with products such as: Allen-Bradley 140M-RC2E, Eaton PKZM0, Siemens S00 and Schneider Electric GV2.

Available are four configurations; long and short support frames, adaptor ratings of 16A and 32A and an adaptor width of 45mm.

OM Adaptors-s

RIttal enclosures – The System http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal Cooling Units for Quiet Environments

Rittal’s ‘Blue e’ cooling units are usually found controlling the temperature within enclosures in workshops or on shop floors in the industrial sector where noise level is largely irrelevant as they cannot be heard above other equipment in these noisy environments.
In situations such as laboratories, offices or other more peaceful areas where cooling is required, Rittal’s TopTherm ‘Blue e’ roof-mounted cooling unit range successfully provide cooling where excessive noise would be an irritant to personnel working close to an enclosure.

With nominal outputs of 1.1 kW, Rittal roof-mounted cooling units for office applications offer viable solutions when it may have been assumed they would simply be too noisy.

Rittal’s ‘Blue e’ cooling units benefit from the intelligent and targeted use of energy, electronically commutated (EC) fan technology and are proven to achieve energy savings of up to 45%. Nano-coated condenser coils negate the need for filters and an integrated electric condensate evaporator maintains an efficient supply of cooling for longer periods of time extending maintenance intervals.

TopTherm roof mounted unit

Rittal Enclosures – The System http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal offer International Service and System Support

Consisting of products, engineering tools and customer support, ‘Rittal – The System’ is completed with Rittal International Service.  A total of 64 subsidiaries, more than 150 service partners and over 1,000 service technicians guarantee a local service and fast response times.

Rittal International Service now offer tailored service agreements to protect production processes and safeguard productivity that will maintain the value of equipment and systems, minimise downtime and allow costs to be managed over the long-term.

Select from  a wide-range of available service packages, including Basic, Comfort, Advanced, Full and Customised. The packages offer various options for availability of Rittal support, response time, spare parts availability, maintenenace visits and extended warranty.
Rittal’s cooling products situated in harsh industrial environments consistently demonstrate high quality and reliability. Regular preventative maintenance leads to longer product service life for increased equipment profitability. Also available Rittal’s warranty extensions between one and three years will provide reassurance for a total warranty period of up to five years

Simply call, send an e-mail or visit http://www.rittalservice.co.uk/customer-service
for 24 hour international assistance.

 

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Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

INFRARAIL 2014

20 – 22 May : Earls Court 2 London

The UK’s definitive rail event returns this month to Earls Court, London. Join thousands of industry professionals to hear the latest news, see the latest products and meet key people from the industry.

Visit us on stand D53 to see the very best in equipment enclosure systems for the Rail industry

We are pleased to invite you to view our range of equipment enclosures and associated power, cooling & security solutions suitable for the rail industry.

As one of the world’s leading manufacturers of modular enclosures and systems, Rittal can supply outdoor cabinets, 19” racks, signalling, network & comms enclosures, designed to meet varied and demanding environmental challenges, thus protecting your valuable & critical equipment from temperature, weather, impact and unwanted access.

Come along to see for yourself and speak to the product experts to understand what ‘Rittal – The System’ will mean for you.

We look forward to seeing you there

Pre-Register Now (saving £20 on the door) http://www.infrarail.com/

Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

Realism should rule in infrastructure debate | Opinion | The Engineer

Realism should rule in infrastructure debate | Opinion | The Engineer.

Stuart Nathan

So here we are again. Business case for High Speed 2, take five. In some ways  this reminds me a little of Lewis Carroll’s the Hunting of the Snark — not a  poem in several chapters, according to Carroll, but an Agony, in several Fits.  The progress of HS2 is indeed agonising, and the paroxysms of opposition do seem  fit-like. And, like much of Carroll’s work, many dismiss it as nonsense.

There are those who think that taking five tries at the business case for  such a large project smacks of desperation. Among those is Evan Davies,  presenter of Radio 4’s Today programme, who noted that the argument in the new  document had shifted from the increased speed of travel to the improvements in  carrying capacity. Doesn’t that mean you’ve run out of ideas, he asked transport  secretary Patrick McLoughlan yesterday.

But of course capacity has been at the centre of the strategy of HS2 from the  start, as readers of our coverage of the project will know. The  Engineer has been broadly supportive of HS2 because we’ve always spoken to  the engineers involved in planning the project rather than politicians, and  they’ve given us arguments that make more sense. Whether they make £50bn-worth  of sense is another matter, and that’s an argument worth having (and where our  support comes up against serious questions).

It’s the issue of capacity and alternatives which the latest study seeks to  answer. This government’s record with statistics is dodgy to say the least, so  its conclusions must be subject to scrutiny. But the assertion that upgrading  the West Coast Mainline to provide the same capacity benefits as HS2 would lead  to 14 years of service disruption and weekend closures should at least inject  some more realism into the arguments of HS2 critics.

It’s always seemed that suggesting the approach of upgrading existing lines  as an alternative has seemed glib, as though it would be easy, or cheap, or free  from any disruption. Whether or not the business case document is correct, there  can be little doubt that such a severe upgrade would cause a long period of  chaos. Other ‘simple’ fixes would surely also require more complex work than  might first appear — can you just replace current rolling stock with  double-decker trains without extensive rail replacement, reinforcement,  rebuilding of bridges, and station refurbishment to cope with extra  passengers?

If the report  refocuses the pro and con camps on the actual issues, rather than on rhetoric  which doesn’t address the actual engineering, then that has to be a good thing.  A project such as this needs to be discussed, and not in the context of  political point-scoring and hysteria.

The argument that HS2 will take express trains off the West Coast line and  allow it to carry more stopping services seems sound and is familiar to us. It’s  also argued that this would allow the West Coast to carry more freight, taking  heavy traffic off the road. The arguments are strongly dependent on the demand  for rail continuing to rise, and this is something worth debating — with  increasing internet capacity and ‘virtual meetings’, do businesspeople really  need to travel that much? If not, would non-business travel justify the cost?  Would people rather take the train than drive?

We idly wondered whether the arguments over HS2 would have been different if  the project were scheduled to start in the North, with phase one connecting  Leeds and Manchester to Birmingham and phasetwo completing the link to London.  Would there have been less opposition, with the plan more clearly emphasising  the connectivity where there is currently none? The cynical view is that of  course there wouldn’t – the opponents would just be saying “Why build the  line in the North where there aren’t enough people to use it? Put it in the  South where the trains are so full that the doors won’t close!”

Read more:  http://www.theengineer.co.uk/opinion/comment/realism-should-rule-in-infrastructure-debate/1017385.article#ixzz2jD7pLcgD