Key Trends & Challenges in the Global IT market

By Clive Partridge, Rittal’s Product Manager IT Infrastructure

Introduction
The growth of artificial intelligence and analytics, digital twin, block-chain and edge are just a few trends that characterise the rapid developments within the IT technology.
All of them will have a major impact on the network and the data centre market.

Alongside comprehensive digitization, these technologies are now transforming every industry sector as well as our homes, so actually they criss-cross our whole society. As a result, they are driving the development of the next generation of data centre technology. Large data centres will continue to be dominant, but we expecting edge data centres to grow in number to deal with the flood of data created by these technologies.

The future of cloud, edge and 5G technologies
The IoT and IIoT are going to change the IT landscape dramatically. By 2020, it’s expected that up to 43 billion devices will be connected to the IoT (Statista). That amount of data cannot be handled by hyperscale/cloud data centres, which is why we’re expecting a significant growth in the number of edge data centres to cope with the volume of data, and to respond and react with very short latency.

5G will be the second major game changer. The GSMA, which represents the interests of mobile operators worldwide, has forecasted that there will be 1.2 billion 5G connections by 2025.

It will have a major impact on private and industrial applications. 5G will be the core technology for autonomous driving cars, VR controlled robots and machines, as well as many other new emerging technologies. It’s this combination of extra bandwidth and performance (5G), plus the growth of edge data centres, which will be the foundation of digitization and new services.

It is important to note, by the way, that edge data centres are always associated with a corresponding cloud; edge and cloud are interrelated technologies.

Regional IT infrastructure assets
The greatest potential for the growth of IT infrastructure assets is likely to be in the North American, European and Asian region – in particular in China. In addition to the traditional hyperscale data centres, OCP technology will continue to grow in importance.

In Europe, with the advancement of IIoT technology as part of Industry 4.0, the edge data centre segment should see above-average growth.

Next Steps for Rittal
Rittal has already established itself in the hyperscale/colocation market, and has many well-known IT companies within its customer base. The Lefdal Mine Datacentre has shown how we can apply our experience to large-scale data centres.

Going forward, the focus will increasingly be on edge data centres in order to position Rittal as a driving force within this segment and it is one where we will continue to contribute our know-how and expertise in order to provide cross-industry solutions.

Further information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on twitter @rittal_ltd.

Rittal’s Support Arm System now with automatic potential equalisation

Rittal is the first manufacturer to ensure automatic potential equalisation as a standard with its new CP 60/120/180 support arm system, without any extra work and additional costs to users.

Where previously the focus has been on the mechanical structure of support arm systems, cable installations within support arm systems often had no passive internal safety devices, such as edge protection elements, to prevent chafed cables. Active protective measures were also absent, such as automatic potential equalisation throughout all the elements of a support arm system to protect the operator from live electrical voltage in the event of a defective cable.
With Rittal’s new CP 60/120/180 support arm system all the rotating elements have so-called sliding contacts to ensure a reliable electrical contact throughout the entire system. Clever edge protection elements made of plastic, which can simply be clipped onto the inner section between extrusions and corner pieces prevent cables from becoming pinched or chafed.

As an integrated modular system, Rittal’s CP 60/120/180 support arm system offers plant constructors uniform function, assembly and engineering solutions in one design, and meets all the load ranges up to 180 kg demanded by the market. It also offers major time savings during assembly, adjustment, and service.

CP Support arm.jpg-s

Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

How British engineers built the modern world – Interesting article from the Engineer

Interesting article from the Engineer By Stephen Harris

The stark contrast between the public estimation of architects and engineers in Britain is a reminder of the widespread lack of understanding of what engineers do.

An architect is typically seen as a highly educated and skilled professional making great contributions to civilisation through their mixture of creativity, flair for design and technical understanding. An engineer, if not thought to be boiler fixer, is relegated to the position of someone who makes other people’s great ideas happen.

But from the second half of the twentieth century, the line between the two professions was blurred somewhat by architectural movements that saw a building’s form follow its function and where design was guided and advanced by the adoption of new construction materials and techniques.

The “high-tech” or “industrial” style began as a radical and sometimes controversial way of thinking about buildings but has become one of the world’s dominant architectural approaches to creating public and commercial buildings.

Characterised by a prominent exposure of a building’s structural and functional components and the use of pre-fabricated elements such as steel frames, glass panels and supporting cables, the high-tech style can be seen in buildings from the Gherkin in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, to the Burj al-Arab in Dubai and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong.

The movement is now being reassessed by a new exhibition and TV show (the first episode of which was broadcast last night), which not only highlight the role of British architects in creating and spreading the high-tech style, but also pay some long overdue recognition to the crucial role of engineering in its formation and practice.

The architects covered by The Brits Who Built The Modern World, who include Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Nicholas Grimshaw, were both inspired by engineers and the technology they produced and often worked with them from the very beginnings of a project.1

‘None of [the key features of high-tech architecture] come about except by close collaboration between engineers and architects right from inception,’ says Tristram Carfrae, chair of Arup’s global buildings practice and a structural engineer who has worked on many high-tech buildings including the Lloyds building in London, the HSBC building in Hong Kong and the National Aquatic Centre in Beijing.

‘This is about architects and engineers sitting down and talking to each other about what are our potential ambitions working together, what are the opportunities and how can we approach this project before anyone gets a pen out and starts drawing anything. It comes from a philosophical position not an aesthetic position.’

In practice, this often means designing the shape of a building or building element to follow the limitations of a particular material or engineering principle. For example, the Schlumberger Cambridge Research building designed by Michael and Patricia Hopkins comprises a Teflon-coated glass-fibre membrane suspended from a steel superstructure – essentially a giant tent.

Read more: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/civil-and-structural/opinion/how-british-engineers-built-the-modern-world/1018030.article#ixzz2tgeARd1z

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Interesting article from theengineer.co.uk

China Crisis?

16 October 2013 | By Stuart Nathan

The chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, is in China, attempting to  open the floodgates to a rush of investment from its overflowing coffers from  mass manufacturing and raw materials into the UK economy. A major focus of the  trade mission is to secure investment in the UK’s nuclear sector, with an  agreement signed yesterday on civil nuclear cooperation between the two  countries and talks believed to be taking place on China’s state-owned operator,  Chinese General Nuclear Power Group (CGN), taking a substantial minority stake  in the Hinkley Point C station which EDF is proposing to build in Somerset.

The Financial Times is reporting that part of the deal will allow  CGN itself to build and co-operate a nuclear power station in the UK at some  unspecified point in the future, subject to the same safety regulations that  other operators have to meet. CGN’s reactor design would also have to pass the  Generic Design Assessment necessary for any new reactor to be approved for UK  use.

We’re all now aware of the government’s approach to UK infrastructure: it  doesn’t matter who owns it as long as it works. But this one will ring alarm  bells.

When EdF is saying that British firms can’t reach the material traceability  standards to even provide components for Hinkley Point — UK engineering  contribution seems to be limited to digging holes and pouring concrete — should we really be laying down quite as much of a red carpet to Chinese  firms, whose regard for safety is an unknown quantity? In fact, with continuing  concerns about Chinese cyber-attacks on foreign governments’ computer systems,  should we really be inviting companies which many believe to be effectively arms  of the Chinese government into our critical infrastructure at all?

Read more:  http://www.theengineer.co.uk/opinion/comment/china-crisis/1017316.article#ixzz2htEX1KoC

Rittal Enclosures www.rittal.co.uk