What’s on at Drives & Controls

Stands: D230, D964 & E224

Dedicate to the best in power transmission, motion control and automation, the Drives & Controls exhibition is almost here.

Rittal will be in three areas demonstrating the best in innovative enclosures for internal and external applications, climate control heating and cooling systems, power distribution switchboard and motor control products on display.

Main Stand D230 (88m²) – Hall 3
Featuring ‘The System‘ display, new support arm, TS-IT rack, Top Therm Chiller, TopConsole System |TP, Flex-Block, software demo areas and Rittal Partner enclosure

Stand D964 (59.5m²) – Hall 3
Featuring the Rittal Bus

Stand E224 (21m²)– Hall 3A (European Offshore & Energy Pavilion)
Products specific to the energy market – Wall mounted enclosures, Purge unit and TS-IT

Drives & Controls Flash - 2014

Rittal enclosures, the system. http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal Housings for TFT monitors

Rittal’s stylish housings, with a protection category of IP 65 shielding devices from exposure to dust and water jets, are designed to accommodate TFT screens up to 24” (measured along the diagonal) in the popular 16:9 and 16:10 widescreen formats.

A full-width viewing window made from a single-pane of safety glass maximises the display area and a combination of rounded edges and aluminium grips prevent injury. The side facing the operator has an attractive look and feel.

Housings containing TFT screens can be mounted quickly and efficiently thanks to a holder with the VESA 75/100 mounting hole pattern. A hinged door on the back of the housing provides easy access to the device. Manufactured from sheet steel, Rittal’s housing measures 650 x 450 x155 mm.

To provide additional ways of connecting to a machine according to the needs of the application, the housing can easily be mounted to a support arm system from Rittal’s CP 60/120/180 range.

With eccentrically mounted support arms, the housing can be placed in various positions, such as in niches. For the fitter’s convenience, pre-punched holes are provided in the reinforcing plate.

Rittal Operating Housing TFT 24inch-s

http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/product/list.action?categoryPath=/PG0001/PG0900ZUBEHOER1/PG0920ZUBEHOER1/PG1114ZUBEHOER1/

Rittal enclosure systems for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

How British engineers built the modern world – Interesting article from the Engineer

Interesting article from the Engineer By Stephen Harris

The stark contrast between the public estimation of architects and engineers in Britain is a reminder of the widespread lack of understanding of what engineers do.

An architect is typically seen as a highly educated and skilled professional making great contributions to civilisation through their mixture of creativity, flair for design and technical understanding. An engineer, if not thought to be boiler fixer, is relegated to the position of someone who makes other people’s great ideas happen.

But from the second half of the twentieth century, the line between the two professions was blurred somewhat by architectural movements that saw a building’s form follow its function and where design was guided and advanced by the adoption of new construction materials and techniques.

The “high-tech” or “industrial” style began as a radical and sometimes controversial way of thinking about buildings but has become one of the world’s dominant architectural approaches to creating public and commercial buildings.

Characterised by a prominent exposure of a building’s structural and functional components and the use of pre-fabricated elements such as steel frames, glass panels and supporting cables, the high-tech style can be seen in buildings from the Gherkin in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, to the Burj al-Arab in Dubai and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong.

The movement is now being reassessed by a new exhibition and TV show (the first episode of which was broadcast last night), which not only highlight the role of British architects in creating and spreading the high-tech style, but also pay some long overdue recognition to the crucial role of engineering in its formation and practice.

The architects covered by The Brits Who Built The Modern World, who include Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Nicholas Grimshaw, were both inspired by engineers and the technology they produced and often worked with them from the very beginnings of a project.1

‘None of [the key features of high-tech architecture] come about except by close collaboration between engineers and architects right from inception,’ says Tristram Carfrae, chair of Arup’s global buildings practice and a structural engineer who has worked on many high-tech buildings including the Lloyds building in London, the HSBC building in Hong Kong and the National Aquatic Centre in Beijing.

‘This is about architects and engineers sitting down and talking to each other about what are our potential ambitions working together, what are the opportunities and how can we approach this project before anyone gets a pen out and starts drawing anything. It comes from a philosophical position not an aesthetic position.’

In practice, this often means designing the shape of a building or building element to follow the limitations of a particular material or engineering principle. For example, the Schlumberger Cambridge Research building designed by Michael and Patricia Hopkins comprises a Teflon-coated glass-fibre membrane suspended from a steel superstructure – essentially a giant tent.

Read more: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/civil-and-structural/opinion/how-british-engineers-built-the-modern-world/1018030.article#ixzz2tgeARd1z

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Save Energy by Cooling with Water

 

Rittal air/water heat exchangers are capable of cooling the air in an enclosure to a temperature lower than that of the ambient air. Heat to be removed is transferred to a water circuit and may be conveyed to a remote location before being dissipated. The lack of dependence on ambient air results in a maximum operating ambient air temperature of 70 °C.  Air is recirculated inside the enclosure maintaining an ingress protection category of IP 55.

Cooling with water may also be considered from an energy saving perspective. Air/water heat exchangers supplied with the eComfort controller incorporate the Eco-Mode control functionality. This employs an intelligent strategy to effectively target the use of energy by disabling the internal fan when the temperature inside the enclosure falls to a predetermined level below the setpoint. The fan is then pulsed periodically to ensure the accuracy of the sensed temperature before being permanently enabled when the temperature rises above the predetermined level.

Although the capital cost of a cooling system incorporating multiple air-to-water heat exchangers and a single water chiller may be greater than that of an equivalent number of refrigerant based cooling units, energy savings are typically in the region of 40 per cent.  Efficiency of water cooling systems may be further improved, particularly in the climate of the United Kingdom, by locating water chillers externally and integrating dry air coolers to take advantage of free cooling.

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Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres www.rittal.co.uk

 

Interesting article from theengineer.co.uk

China Crisis?

16 October 2013 | By Stuart Nathan

The chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, is in China, attempting to  open the floodgates to a rush of investment from its overflowing coffers from  mass manufacturing and raw materials into the UK economy. A major focus of the  trade mission is to secure investment in the UK’s nuclear sector, with an  agreement signed yesterday on civil nuclear cooperation between the two  countries and talks believed to be taking place on China’s state-owned operator,  Chinese General Nuclear Power Group (CGN), taking a substantial minority stake  in the Hinkley Point C station which EDF is proposing to build in Somerset.

The Financial Times is reporting that part of the deal will allow  CGN itself to build and co-operate a nuclear power station in the UK at some  unspecified point in the future, subject to the same safety regulations that  other operators have to meet. CGN’s reactor design would also have to pass the  Generic Design Assessment necessary for any new reactor to be approved for UK  use.

We’re all now aware of the government’s approach to UK infrastructure: it  doesn’t matter who owns it as long as it works. But this one will ring alarm  bells.

When EdF is saying that British firms can’t reach the material traceability  standards to even provide components for Hinkley Point — UK engineering  contribution seems to be limited to digging holes and pouring concrete — should we really be laying down quite as much of a red carpet to Chinese  firms, whose regard for safety is an unknown quantity? In fact, with continuing  concerns about Chinese cyber-attacks on foreign governments’ computer systems,  should we really be inviting companies which many believe to be effectively arms  of the Chinese government into our critical infrastructure at all?

Read more:  http://www.theengineer.co.uk/opinion/comment/china-crisis/1017316.article#ixzz2htEX1KoC

Rittal Enclosures www.rittal.co.uk