Rittal Housings for TFT monitors

Rittal’s stylish housings, with a protection category of IP 65 shielding devices from exposure to dust and water jets, are designed to accommodate TFT screens up to 24” (measured along the diagonal) in the popular 16:9 and 16:10 widescreen formats.

A full-width viewing window made from a single-pane of safety glass maximises the display area and a combination of rounded edges and aluminium grips prevent injury. The side facing the operator has an attractive look and feel.

Housings containing TFT screens can be mounted quickly and efficiently thanks to a holder with the VESA 75/100 mounting hole pattern. A hinged door on the back of the housing provides easy access to the device. Manufactured from sheet steel, Rittal’s housing measures 650 x 450 x155 mm.

To provide additional ways of connecting to a machine according to the needs of the application, the housing can easily be mounted to a support arm system from Rittal’s CP 60/120/180 range.

With eccentrically mounted support arms, the housing can be placed in various positions, such as in niches. For the fitter’s convenience, pre-punched holes are provided in the reinforcing plate.

Rittal Operating Housing TFT 24inch-s

http://www.rittal.com/uk-en/product/list.action?categoryPath=/PG0001/PG0900ZUBEHOER1/PG0920ZUBEHOER1/PG1114ZUBEHOER1/

Rittal enclosure systems for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

How British engineers built the modern world – Interesting article from the Engineer

Interesting article from the Engineer By Stephen Harris

The stark contrast between the public estimation of architects and engineers in Britain is a reminder of the widespread lack of understanding of what engineers do.

An architect is typically seen as a highly educated and skilled professional making great contributions to civilisation through their mixture of creativity, flair for design and technical understanding. An engineer, if not thought to be boiler fixer, is relegated to the position of someone who makes other people’s great ideas happen.

But from the second half of the twentieth century, the line between the two professions was blurred somewhat by architectural movements that saw a building’s form follow its function and where design was guided and advanced by the adoption of new construction materials and techniques.

The “high-tech” or “industrial” style began as a radical and sometimes controversial way of thinking about buildings but has become one of the world’s dominant architectural approaches to creating public and commercial buildings.

Characterised by a prominent exposure of a building’s structural and functional components and the use of pre-fabricated elements such as steel frames, glass panels and supporting cables, the high-tech style can be seen in buildings from the Gherkin in London and the Centre Pompidou in Paris, to the Burj al-Arab in Dubai and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong.

The movement is now being reassessed by a new exhibition and TV show (the first episode of which was broadcast last night), which not only highlight the role of British architects in creating and spreading the high-tech style, but also pay some long overdue recognition to the crucial role of engineering in its formation and practice.

The architects covered by The Brits Who Built The Modern World, who include Norman Foster, Richard Rogers and Nicholas Grimshaw, were both inspired by engineers and the technology they produced and often worked with them from the very beginnings of a project.1

‘None of [the key features of high-tech architecture] come about except by close collaboration between engineers and architects right from inception,’ says Tristram Carfrae, chair of Arup’s global buildings practice and a structural engineer who has worked on many high-tech buildings including the Lloyds building in London, the HSBC building in Hong Kong and the National Aquatic Centre in Beijing.

‘This is about architects and engineers sitting down and talking to each other about what are our potential ambitions working together, what are the opportunities and how can we approach this project before anyone gets a pen out and starts drawing anything. It comes from a philosophical position not an aesthetic position.’

In practice, this often means designing the shape of a building or building element to follow the limitations of a particular material or engineering principle. For example, the Schlumberger Cambridge Research building designed by Michael and Patricia Hopkins comprises a Teflon-coated glass-fibre membrane suspended from a steel superstructure – essentially a giant tent.

Read more: http://www.theengineer.co.uk/civil-and-structural/opinion/how-british-engineers-built-the-modern-world/1018030.article#ixzz2tgeARd1z

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s RiDiag II Software

 

Rittal’s TopTherm Blue e cooling units provide an energy efficient means of cooling enclosures. Incorporating the integrated eComfort controller and offering energy savings of up to 45%, the units are compatible with Rittal’s RiDiag II software.


RiDiag II is a setup, diagnostic and data acquisition tool that can be used to view and adjust settings, log equipment data and track performance in real-time. All cooling parameters, such as the enclosure internal temperature setpoint, switching hysteresis, high temperature alarm offset and sensitivity of the filter mat monitoring, can be modified and saved. The results of diagnostic checks may also be stored.


With connection to a PC or laptop the following data can be retrieved from the cooling unit: Time and frequency of any error messages generated, maximum environmental and minimum internal enclosure temperatures recorded and the duty cycle and cooling unit utilisation.


Whether an end user or installer, RiDiag II can be of benefit. It significantly reduces the amount of time taken to set up multiple units with the same parameters, ensures the correct settings are input and creates a backup file of the application specific settings. Saved diagnostic checks document the operating history of a cooling unit and data collected from a cooling unit may be used to identify any faults or incorrect installation.
 

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Rittal enclosure systems for industry and data centres www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal offers a more energy efficient means of ventilating enclosures by supplying electronically commutated (EC) versions of the successful TopTherm fan-and-filter unit, in all but the very smallest size.

Using the same diagonal fan technology as the standard variant, Rittal’s TopTherm EC fan-and-filter unit provides improved performance against static pressure, offering a more constant air throughput and energy savings in excess of 60 percent over previous models. Compliance with ongoing energy efficiency guidelines can be met and exceeded by using EC motors. Intelligent control and fan status monitoring is available for larger units.

Direct monitoring of fan speed is via a tacho-signal output with a malfunction or failure signal, prompting immediately action, minimising the risk of component failure in the enclosure.

Infinitely variable speed control offers a means of conserving energy further by operating the fan at a speed determined by the demand for cooling. A programmable logic controller (PLC) may be used to control the fan motor, via a 0-10V DC or pulse width modulated (PWM) signal.
A sensor that controls the speed of the EC motor by comparison of the actual temperature with a fixed setpoint of 35 °C, will increase the fan speed to produce a cooling effect as the temperature approaches the setpoint, will soon be available from Rittal.

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal’s new Service Website

In recognition of the growing importance of “Service in the field” Rittal has enhanced its’ service capability with the launch of a new dedicated website.

http://www.rittalservice.co.uk/customer-service,

Offering customers the ability to access essential information quickly and easily, the new web site enables clients to learn more about Rittal’s flexible service agreements and to request an engineer, ensuring reduced response times.

Containing a comprehensive library of manuals, allowing quick and easy access to hundreds of documents, the new website also features a spare parts selector to help clients and panel builders identify the correct spares and be confident quality products are used.

Underlining Rittal’s commitment to work in partnership with customers, the new website will provide a means to achieve a fast response in case of breakdown and reduce unnecessary downtime cost.

“We hope that anyone using Rittal’s International Service website will find that Rittal offers service expertise unparalleled in the industry” said Nick Turner, Rittal’s Service Manager.

Rittal New Service Web Site

Rittal New Service Web Site

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Partial doors for Rittal TS and Ri4Power Systems

Suitable for 400, 600 and 800 mm wide TS enclosures Rittal’s new modular partial door can be used instead of a door or rear panel.

Flexible for use with Rittal’s TS 8 and Ri4Power systems, the new partial door enables a wider choice of handles plus for Rittal’s Ri4Power, a new optional viewing window as standard.
Optionally hinged on the left or right, the partial door is attached to the TS enclosure without drilling. To finish off the modular design in each case, a trim panel is required at the top and bottom. The cross member required for mounting is included with the partial door. The front trim panels may be removed from the outside by unscrewing.

Accessories, such as monitor frame, lock inserts (standard double-bit lock insert may be exchanged for lock inserts), comfort handles and perforated mounting strips for retrospective external mounting are available. Perforated mounting strips with a 25 mm pitch pattern of holes may be used for individual mounting of cable ducts, hose holders etc. on the rear side of the door.

Rittal enclosures latest development

Rittal enclosures latest development

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk

Save Energy by Cooling with Water

 

Rittal air/water heat exchangers are capable of cooling the air in an enclosure to a temperature lower than that of the ambient air. Heat to be removed is transferred to a water circuit and may be conveyed to a remote location before being dissipated. The lack of dependence on ambient air results in a maximum operating ambient air temperature of 70 °C.  Air is recirculated inside the enclosure maintaining an ingress protection category of IP 55.

Cooling with water may also be considered from an energy saving perspective. Air/water heat exchangers supplied with the eComfort controller incorporate the Eco-Mode control functionality. This employs an intelligent strategy to effectively target the use of energy by disabling the internal fan when the temperature inside the enclosure falls to a predetermined level below the setpoint. The fan is then pulsed periodically to ensure the accuracy of the sensed temperature before being permanently enabled when the temperature rises above the predetermined level.

Although the capital cost of a cooling system incorporating multiple air-to-water heat exchangers and a single water chiller may be greater than that of an equivalent number of refrigerant based cooling units, energy savings are typically in the region of 40 per cent.  Efficiency of water cooling systems may be further improved, particularly in the climate of the United Kingdom, by locating water chillers externally and integrating dry air coolers to take advantage of free cooling.

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Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres www.rittal.co.uk

 

New Rittal Catalogue 34 – Coming Soon

Rittal’s new Catalogue 34 provides the essential product guide for industrial and IT solutions. Over 700 pages outline latest developments and acts as a comprehensive information resource about available product types, sizes, specifications, software and services, as well as a source of advice and support for customers.

Providing the complete solution for enclosures and enclosure systems, power distribution, climate control and IT Infrastructure across industry and IT applications, Rittal’s latest edition of the Catalogue turns the spotlight onto added value for customers.

Crystal clear navigation allows users to track down the right product in minimal time, make their final selection with ease, find out straight away what accessories are available and then place an order.

The catalogue is available shortly as hard copy, CD or download. To order your copy simply e-mail catalogue34@rittal.co.uk or call 01709 704105.

Rittal Uk Ltd

Rittal Enclosures New Catalogue 34

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres www.rittal.co.uk

Flexible, lightweight, precise climate control from Rittal

Rittal’s thermostatic electric cooler offers flexible and lightweight cooling for a heating solution that offers precise climate control.

Ideal for accurately controlling the temperature to ±1 K in small enclosures providing 100 W of both heating and cooling. The compact size, light weight and low‑vibration operation of the Rittal thermoelectric cooling unit is ideally suited for command panels and support arm systems. The unit may be fitted either externally or, if space around the enclosure is at a premium, internally, leaving only 55 mm protruding outside.

Rittal’s cooler may be  installed either horizontally or vertically on the wall or door of the cabinet and the optional master/slave adaptor can be used to connect multiple units, providing a truly scalable, modular solution.

Peltier technology requires no refrigerant or chilled water to function; an electrical power supply is all that is needed. The range consists of only two units, a DC and an AC variant, which accept 24 V DC and 100‑230 V AC power supplies respectively.

Simplicity itself, the only moving parts of Rittal’s thermoelectric cooler are fans moving air across either side of the solid‑state element which reduce the risk of component failure and maintenance requirements as well as less vibration and noise, both acoustic and electrical  Supplied complete with a USB cable and software, both set up and monitoring of operational parameters may be carried out with ease.

Thermoelectric Cooler-s

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres www.rittal.co.uk