Rittal Launches New Blue e Chillers in 11 to 25 kW output class

Rittal has significantly improved its range of cooling technology for machines and enclosures with its new Blue e chillers in 11 to 25 kW output class.

Using 40 per cent less refrigerant, the devices will make an important contribution to sustainable environmental protection. Meanwhile users benefit from the chillers’ precise temperature control, simplified operation and installation, as well as new safety functions.


Pre-configured option packages, which are quickly available from stock, can meet almost any need, from precision control systems with higher pressure requirements to robust outdoor applications in cold climates.
The re-cooling of liquids by chillers is one of the basic requirements for smooth operation in many industrial processes. For example, enclosures and machine tools must have strict temperature control for the precise machining of metal.


Sustainable and Environmentally Friendly


The latest generation of chillers need to be easy to operate and install, as well as offer maximum user safety. Customers also need fast order turnaround such that customised solutions must be available off-the-shelf, and there is a increased focus on sustainability and environmental performance.


With the development of its new Blue e chiller range and combined with the existing Blue e+ chillers (1.5 to 6kW), Rittal can offer a mature solution package that meets all these needs.


The adoption of a 100 per cent aluminium heat exchanger with micro-channel technology results in stand-out benefits for the user: it improves exchanger efficiency and it reduces the amount of refrigerant needed by 40 per cent compared to other chillers. In addition, the use of aluminium means that the possibility of galvanic corrosion is completely eradicated.

Regulated Performance


The fan and compressor are regulated via a digital controller which means the temperature of the cooling medium can be precisely regulated. As standard, the hysteresis is ± 2 K; however, a precision control (hot gas bypass) of ± 0.25 K is also possible as an option. This prevents temperature fluctuations that cause inaccuracies on the machined workpiece, and also ensures consistent quality.

Ease of Use


The multi-lingual and industrial-grade touch display, plus the intelligent communication interfaces, make both operation and analysis easy.
The parameterisation of the devices, as well as the read-out of the data and messages are performed quickly and shown in plain text. Error messages are prioritised and displayed in three escalation levels.

Rapid Commissioning


Blue e chillers are wired ready for connection and can be up and running quickly, via plug-and-play. Lifting eyebolts make transport easy, as does the base/plinth, which is suitable for transport by forklift truck. Uniform water connections, an adjustable overflow valve (bypass valve) and ideal accessibility to all the components make it easier for fitters and service staff to work on the units.

Designed with Safety in Mind


Integrated overflow valves ensure a constant circulation of cooling water when the consumer is closed, and the pump is running. This protects the coolant pump from overload.
The valve is pre-set for the pump being used 50Hz operation but it can be set for 60Hz. A filling level monitoring system ensures maximum reliability and improved availability. Besides this, optional flow monitors emit an alarm if the flow rate is too low and can detect hydraulic errors such as blockages in the system at an early stage.

Option Packages


Rittal also offers pre-configured option packages that are available quickly from stock and which offer a suitable solution for almost any demand.
For example, performance-enhanced pumps (4 and 6 bar) are available for increased performance. If necessary, a precision control system (hot gas bypass) can be used to improve control accuracy. In addition, the Blue e chillers can be prepared for cold zones of down to minus 20°C, as well as for laser applications, and they can also be fitted with a water-cooled condenser or with pre-heating and customised with special paint.

Further information at www.rittal.co.uk and www.friedhelm-loh-group.com or on Facebook @RittalLimited and Twitter @rittal_ltd.

Business Growth Through IT

White Paper from IDC and Rittal: Data Centres Are Increasingly Becoming a Competitive Factor

In a recent White Paper sponsored by Rittal, provider of IT infrastructure solutions, international market research company IDC examined the influence that data centres have on the economic success of small and medium-sized businesses. The results show that IT infrastructure and especially having one’s own data centre are perceived as essential in permanently securing competitiveness and expansion. The White Paper also shows that companies want to take advantage of new technologies such as cloud, Big Data and mobile computing in order to develop new revenue opportunities. The results are based on an IDC survey of around 500 managers and IT heads in medium-sized companies in Germany, the United Kingdom, Sweden, the Netherlands and Italy.

The most important findings at a glance:

Direct correlation between IT spending and revenue growth

If a company was commercially successful last year, this has a direct impact on the IT budget. As many as 98% of organizations with increasing sales reported that they would enlarge their investment in IT, or at least keep it at the same level. Furthermore, the survey showed that economically successful companies invest an average 20% more in their IT than businesses with flat sales figures.

Having one’s own data centre is the key to success

No fewer than 93% of the IT managers questioned found it important or very important for a company to have its own data centre. Of those companies surveyed that registered a growth in sales last year, 97% operated their own data centre.

Energy efficiency offers the potential to cut costs

Companies have some catching up to do, particularly when it comes to energy efficiency: 57% of respondents report PUE (power usage effectiveness) values exceeding 2.0. For every kilowatt-hour of electricity consumed by the IT equipment, roughly the same amount again is consumed by cooling and further building and plant technology. The PUE represents the energy consumed in the data centre in relation to the energy consumption of the computer: The closer the PUE value gets to one, the more efficient the data centre is. In industrial applications, a PUE value of 1.4 is regarded as excellent while large IT service provider with optimized systems reach values of 1.2 or less.

The data centre is too cold

The IT managers surveyed indicated that they operate their data centres at an average of temperature of 15.5°C. According to IDC, there are enormous savings potentials in this area. Instead of cooling entire rooms, it is more efficient to work with direct cooling within the rack or in the individual aisles. As a result, a higher overall temperature is allowed in the room, reducing the costs of cooling.

Greater reliability needed

Existing redundancy concepts are often out-of-date and not sufficiently reliable to ensure the high level of availability that customers expect in today’s competitive market environment. 24% percent of the IT administrators questioned cited redundant infrastructure as the key area in need of modernising. Overall, only 46% of IT experts assess the viability of their own IT as very high. Nevertheless, the majority (79%) of IT decision-makers believe that none of the demands is insurmountable.

Investment backlog in the data centre

The participants surveyed reported that their data centres were an average of 6.9 years old. With this age it is already difficult to use modern IT equipment as they have a higher energy density and must be highly available. For example, the energy efficiency of IT components and the cooling concepts for racks and server rooms have evolved considerably in recent years. This creates demand for IT modernisation.

New technologies are changing IT strategy

IT systems need to evolve continuously so that a company’s own data centre will also be able to meet such business needs as greater agility and cost efficiency in future. Six out of ten companies would like to meet the new market requirements with public or hybrid cloud capacity, but they shy away from the risks. This means, for example, a greater focus on in-house data centres, which are operated by the company itself and offer private cloud solutions. More than 75% of managers expect a modified IT strategy, either due to mobile computing or as a result of Big Data.

This research has shown that IT is an important factor in achieving business goals. This means that many companies are willing to invest in technologies such as cloud, Big Data, or mobile computing. The key to success is having one’s own data centre, as aspects such as reliability and availability have a high priority”, says Dirk Miller, Rittal’s Executive Vice President, Marketing.

“IT infrastructures need to be renewed to keep pace with the market. The question is whether to modernise or to rebuild”, explains Bernd Hanstein, Vice President Product Management IT at Rittal. “We see a great deal of potential in efficient, adaptive cooling concepts. Then IT managers can fully exploit the advantages of greater flexibility and reductions in ancillary costs.”

Modular data centres increase agility

The concept of a modular data centre helps companies achieve greater agility and scalability. This permits shorter product life cycles, as well as the more rapid commissioning of new systems or implementation of new regulations. Even if these concepts are still relatively new on the market, awareness of them is growing. According to IDC, this market segment has recorded double-digit growth in recent years. In EMEA, investments worth hundreds of millions amounts have been made.

“Modular data centres are a rational way of meeting current business challenges. The preconfigured modules or containers tend to be more cost effective than newly built conventional data centres, and they can be set up within a few weeks”, explains Chris Ingle, Vice President, IDC.

The study is available at http://www.rittal.com/idc-whitepaper

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Rittal Enclosures, Power Distribution, Climate Control, IT Infrastructure, Software & Services – http://www.rittal.co.uk

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal offers a more energy efficient means of ventilating enclosures by supplying electronically commutated (EC) versions of the successful TopTherm fan-and-filter unit, in all but the very smallest size.

Using the same diagonal fan technology as the standard variant, Rittal’s TopTherm EC fan-and-filter unit provides improved performance against static pressure, offering a more constant air throughput and energy savings in excess of 60 percent over previous models. Compliance with ongoing energy efficiency guidelines can be met and exceeded by using EC motors. Intelligent control and fan status monitoring is available for larger units.

Direct monitoring of fan speed is via a tacho-signal output with a malfunction or failure signal, prompting immediately action, minimising the risk of component failure in the enclosure.

Infinitely variable speed control offers a means of conserving energy further by operating the fan at a speed determined by the demand for cooling. A programmable logic controller (PLC) may be used to control the fan motor, via a 0-10V DC or pulse width modulated (PWM) signal.
A sensor that controls the speed of the EC motor by comparison of the actual temperature with a fixed setpoint of 35 °C, will increase the fan speed to produce a cooling effect as the temperature approaches the setpoint, will soon be available from Rittal.

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal TopTherm EC fan-and-filter units

Rittal enclosures for industry and data centres http://www.rittal.co.uk